example2
 
I.D. Area Designation Comments Conservation Stage
   
030801

Engine No2.

Port inner

Bristol Pegasus XXII, nine cylinder air cooled radial engine. The radial engine has similar pistons, valves and spark plugs to those that any four-stroke engine has. The big difference is in the crankshaft

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-001

Engine No2.

Port inner

Supercharger impellor and shaft. Built into the rear crankcase housing, the fuel-air mixture passed from the carburetor through the supercharger then out to individual intake pipes to the cylinders Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-002

Engine No2.

Port inner

Rebuilt section of the supercharger blower casing (volute) along with two of the intermediate gears and the intermediate bearing support ring. The curved 'rim-like' outer structure is what remains of the induction chamber

Complete.
On Display

example2
030801-003

Engine No2.

Port inner

Single throw crankshaft, designed to move in a rotary motion when the connecting rods applied force to it. Its job was to change the movement of the pistons to a circular motion, which then powered the airscrew

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-004

Engine No2.

Port inner

Master and articulating rod assembly. A single hub which all of the connecting rods attach to. One rod is fixed, known as the master rod. Articulated rods fasten by means of knuckle pins to the central flange

 

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-005

Engine No2.

Port inner

Airscrew blades - De Havilland Hamilton two position variable pitch airscrew. V.P. blades were actuated by oil pressure from the main engine supply, by way of a pipe line from the control valve which was positioned in the oil transfer housing at the front of the reduction gear casing

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-006

Engine No2.

Port inner

3No Cowling support struts

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-007

Engine No2.

Port inner

Stainless steel cowling. All nine cylinders connected to this and were then routed out above the wing via the exhaust tail pipe (I.D. 090804). Crew members described this getting so hot, it would glow dull red at night. With exhaust gases in excess of 1,000 °C it's no surprise!

Complete.
On Display
example2
030801-008

Engine No2.

Port inner

Cam gears. Designed to run the cam 1/8 speed in the opposite direction to the crankshaft, a two stage gear reduction was used to achieve this

Complete.
On Display
example2
060701

Forward Hull

Demountable mooring post. When on operations this was stored in the forward compartment, when the nose turret was retracted the post would be fitted into a socket and a mooring line could be attached

Complete.
On Display
example2
060702

Cockpit

Throttles - These set the power level, controlling the mass flow-rate of air/fuel mixture delivered to the cylinders, speeding up or slowing the engine rotation. Levers marked red controlled the port (left) engines and levers marked green controlled the starboard (right) engines

Complete.
On Display
example2
060801

Forward Hull

'Astro' dome, originally integral to the top hatch. When afloat, this gave the crew access to the upper surfaces of the aircraft. During patrols, the navigator would take sightings from here and during combat conditions it would act as the Firing Control Centre

Complete.
On Display
example2
090802

Forward Hull

One of the four compasses Sunderlands were equipped with

Complete.
On Display
example2
090803

Forward Hull

Part of the dual activation system for the aircrafts control surfaces. the toothed gears received chain drives from the pilots control columns

Complete.
On Display
example2
090805

Forward Hull

Porthole, opening type. Opening porthole covers are different to non-opening, the outer diameter of the Porthole is 37.5cm, the inner actual diameter of the opening in the hull is 35.5cm The clear transparent part is 30.5 cm (same as none opening porthole, see I.D. 150903)

Storage example2
100707

Forward Hull

Sherd of fusilage skin. Hull construction was vertical frames of channel section, interconnected by stiffeners of 'Z' section. The sheeting was riveted on longitudinally with countersunk rivets, giving a flush surface

Storage example2
100801

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Exhaust tail pipe. All nine cylinders connected to the cowling (I.D. 110601) and were then routed out above the wing via this exhaust tail

Storage example2
100830

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Cylinder valve assemblies. There were four of these per cylinder head, two sodium cooled exhaust and two inlet. Inlet valves would reach temperatures of approx. 300 °C to 550 °C, outlet valves up to 1,000 °C

Complete.
On display
example2
100831

Cockpit

Advance/Retard trim unit - Trim tabs are small surfaces connected to the trailing edge of control surfaces, used to control the trim of the controls, and stabilise the aircraft without the need for the pilot to constantly apply a control force. Changing the setting of a trim tab adjusts the neutral or resting position of a control surface (such as an elevator or rudder)

Complete.
On display
example2
100832

Forward Hull

Upper Deck

Sprocket - Bakelite, conically shaped with teeth on outside edge. Metal spindle and grip. Probably part of the Direction Finder Loop Antenna manual rotation mechanism. Has indicator arrow and 'L' stamped in

 

 

Mike Hurley

Workshop

 

example2
100839

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Fuel filter

Storage example2
110601

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Bristol Pegasus XXII nine cylinder radial engine. Fell to pieces as excavation progressed. The majority of parts were recovered individually as work proceeded

Complete.
On Display
example2
110601-001

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Reduction gear, known as a bevel planetary-type gear system, used to reduce the propellor speed below that of the engine rotation. This prevented the propellor tips exceeding the speed of sound and losing power due to the excess drag of the propeller tips making shock waves

Complete.
On Display
example2
110601-002

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Magneto ring - each engine cylinder was equipped with two sparking plugs, each plug having a separate magneto system. Dual ignition was especially important for large bore engines such as the Pegasus XXII

Complete.
On Display
example2
110601-003

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Engine cylinder - the body is surrounded by cooling fins. The cylinder head screwed into place as can be seen by the presence of threads at the top. Above these is a narrow tapering spigot to accommodate a copper jointing ring. The lower end is spigoted to fit into the crankcase

 

 

Complete.
On Display

 

example2
110601-009

Engine No3.

Starboard inner

Tie rod and push rods with rocker assembly. (One set of these to each cylinder). Valve-train: Four push-rod-actuated valves per cylinder, two inlet and two sodium-cooled exhaust valves

Complete.
On Display

example2
090804

Engine No1.

Port outer

Exhaust tail pipe. All nine cylinders connected to the cowling (I.D. 030801-007) and were then routed out above the wing via this exhaust tail Complete.
On Display
example2
130901 Nose Turret Vickers 'K' type Gas Operated .303 calibre machine gun. Palmer hydraulic remote firing mechanism in place and part of gun mount. Ammunition magazine missing Complete.
On Display
example2
130902 Nose Turret Starboard 'A' frame stay Desalination example2
130904 Nose Turret Starboard leg of turret 'A' frame Complete.
In Storage
example2
140701 Nose Turret

'A' frame, 1No ammunition magazine attached, 100 live rounds. O/head hydraulic connectors and top pivot are in place. Starboard leg I.D. 130904 recovered in 2013.

Ammunition disarmed

Mike Hurley

Workshop

 

example2
140702 Nose Turret Nash and Thompson FN11 turret mounting ring. Including gunner's seat. Misc. equipment attachment points still in place (turret controls, firing mechanism) majority of gun mount still in place on starboard side  

Mike Hurley

Workshop

example2
140703 Rear Turret Plexi-glass sections (7No). Portside panel shown

Complete.

On Display

example2
140704 Forward Hull 2No lengths (approx. 3m each) of brass hydraulic pipe. Shaped to follow bulkhead adjacent Wireless Operators Station Desalination example2
140705 Nose Turret Plexi-glass panel with ventilation slots

Complete.

Storage

example2
140706 Cockpit Metal object heavily concreted (unrecognisable) Desalination example2
140707 Forward Hull - Flight Engineers Panel Possible 'Boost Gauge' - Indicated the supercharger boost pressure. Engine-driven air compressors provided varying levels of boost according to engine rpm, load etc. There was a power band within a given range of available boost pressure, which was shown by this gauge Desalination example2
140708 Cockpit Advance/Retard trim unit - Trim tabs are small surfaces connected to the trailing edge of control surfaces, used to control the trim of the controls, and stabilise the aircraft without the need for the pilot to constantly apply a control force. Changing the setting of a trim tab adjusts the neutral or resting position of a control surface (such as an elevator or rudder). Desalination example2
140901 Cockpit Pilot's foot operated rudder controls, both the Pilot's and co-Pilot's rudder controls have been recovered Desalination example2
140904 Forward Hull - Wireless Operator Station Antenna reel with antenna. This was mounted at the side of the W/O station on the upper deck. The antenna was threaded down through a hinged tube and out through the planing hull to trail below the aircraft. The W/O was responsible for manually winding it in or out Desalination example2
140907 Forward Hull

Copper bodied 'Muff' style roof mounted hot water cabin heater. Heat was provided by means of a heat exchanger from the exhaust of engine No2

(port inner)

Desalination example2
140909

Starboard Wing -

Auxillary Engine Compartment

Mounted in the A.E.C this Rotax Ltd Generator (Dynamo) which had a H.T. Output of 800v and a L.T. Output of 6v. Was driven by a small ABC (All British engine Company) two cylinder four stroke engine, and was used for accumulator charging

Desalination.

Mike Hurley

Workshop

example2
140910 Forward Hull - Wing Part of rotating starboard flap torque shaft system. The flaps were Gouge type, that slid backwards along four curved tracks, moving rearwards and down, increasing the wing area and adding 30% more lift for landing Desalination example2
140912 Cockpit Elevator control interconnecting levers. These were linked to the control columns and operated the cables actuating the elevators On Display example2
140913 Forward Hull Control surface cable pulley wheel. A whole series of these were distributed between the Pilot/co-pilot controls and the aircrafts control surfaces. Desalination example2
140914 Forward Hull Fuel trap, this collected excess fuel from the pipe connected to the 'Boost Gauge' which indicated the supercharger boost pressure

Conservation.

Mike Hurley

Workshop

example2
150801 Cockpit Cockpit fenestration, fragment of 'windshield' framing Desalination example2
150802 Wings - Fuel System Fuel check valve - (non return valve) component of the fuel system used to provide an uninterrupted flow of fuel regardless of the aircraft’s attitude. When raised from the site, the unit had a wire band and seal to secure the cap. Unfortunately this crumbled into small pieces almost immediately.

Desalination.

Mike Hurley

Workshop

example2
150803 Nose Turret Hydraulic connection Desalination example2
150804 Wings - Fuel System Support bracket for fuel check valve (I.D. 150802) Desalination example2
150805 Wings - Floats Section of float wire stay system Desalination example2
150806 Wings - Fuel System Piece of fuel line Desalination example2
150807 Wings - Fuel System Section of fuel line with branch Desalination example2
150901 Wings - Tailplane Part of elevator hinge rod. Located at the rear of the fusilage, there was a horizontal stabiliser and an elevator on each side. The stabiliser was a fixed wing section which provided stability for the aircraft, keeping it flying straight. The elevator is the small moving section at the rear of the stabiliser, attached to the fixed sections by hinges Desalination example2
150902

Engine No1.

Port outer

Portion of wiring loom component (Distributor). Desalination example2
150903

Rear Hull

Porthole (Starboard side) non-opening porthole, transparency diameter 30.5cm. (Also see I.D. 090805 opening type) Desalination example2
150904

Rear Hull

Fragment of 'Z' stringer. This is a ubiquitous feature of the Sunderland's hull construction Desalination example2
150905

Rear Turret

FN 4 turret flash shield (1 of 4) remainder still in-situ Desalination example2